Image for post
Image for post

If you were to stumble on the American political scene right now to commercials and media from one side of the aisle about the other, you’d think you were in a twilight zone where somehow working with the otherside is a bad thing that hurts your election chances. Let’s just get this straight. Working together, which is the only way to get things done, is now becoming frowned upon in our country. If you weren’t convinced that polarization is the most important issue to solve before anything else can get done, you should be now. Polarization has gotten so bad that people dislike the other side so much that anyone working with them must automatically be working on the principles of the other side. How terrible!!! …


Image for post
Image for post

When most people think of retirement they imagine their last day on the job around the age of 65, they imagine having worked hard for 40+ years saving what they can and relaxing for the rest of their lives or maybe taking a part-time job. However, there’s a new concept of retirement emerging. It was there all along, in fact, but people are learning new ways to approach it. This concept is that retirement is simply freeing yourself from work you don’t want to do. Reaching the end goal of your grind. Whether that means finding work that you’d be happy doing for the rest of your life, working for yourself, making enough to stop working early and following your passions, or just learning how to live without much money. …


Image for post
Image for post

As I write this, President Trump and his team are gearing up to launch a legal battle against several states claiming election fraud in multiple ways. I think we all know how this is going to go. There will be another drawn-out, exhausting news cycle covering yet another partisan political battle for the next month or so. Ultimately, it won’t change anything and Biden will be sworn in as president in January. …


Image for post
Image for post
Alice Mollon

Historically speaking, work has been something that has been necessary to prop up a civilization, to continue its existence, and to provide resources for its citizens. However, for possibly the first time in human history, we are reaching a point where a lot of ‘work’ that is done, is not beneficial for our society. However, even though oftentimes work is not essential to society, it is more often than not essential to the survival of the individual working. This is a by-product of capitalism, yes, however, it is specifically the byproduct of capitalism in this current time, in this specific country that spends its tax dollars to primarily benefit the rich. It is this dynamic right here that is driving the rot and economic turmoil and inequality that we are coming to know the United States for. For instance, a poll earlier this year found that about 74% of workers in the United States are living paycheck to paycheck and another poll found only 34% of people find meaning in their careers. However, escaping this dynamic is not as easy as one would hope. To do this would take a complete overhaul of our values as a country and how we view work. This isn’t to say we shouldn’t escape this dynamic though. In fact, it is absolutely essential to the survival of the parts of our country we still value to do so and even more so to bring back to life the idea of the American Dream. What would that look like? Well, it would mean that work and a paycheck aren’t inherently tied and that someone could still live a dignified life without working. …


Image for post
Image for post

One of the things that makes me laugh the most in the debate of Capitalism vs. Socialism is that no society is 100% capitalist or 100% socialist. In reality, these two systems exist on a scale. The more capitalist the country, the less socialist, and the more socialist, the less capitalist. Here in America, our country is about 20% socialist, socialism meaning anything spent on everyone from a single source, the government, and 80% capitalist, more on how I reached these numbers later. However, people will argue over why capitalism or socialism is better. What’s sad about this is that this misaligned debate is taking over the political conversation in our country. Those on the right sit in existential fear of a complete socialist takeover, something even Bernie Sanders wasn’t advocating for, and those on the left feel like socialism as a whole needs to be how we run our country. Again, something not even Bernie Sanders was advocating for. …


Image for post
Image for post

The conversation over economic equality is probably the messiest in all of human history. We’ve spent thousands of years, knowingly or not, figuring out which economic system works the best in different levels of civilization. While we’ve gone through many systems we’ve more-or-less landed on the most stable ones. Some people reduce today’s conversation to Socialism vs. Capitalism although that misrepresents the problem. Many people today favor different parts, a combination, of ‘socialism’ and ‘capitalism’. In a way, every major civilization on the globe today is a combination of these systems that simply lean one way or the other. One could argue they are the most complete economic theories of society and that they both at least address the major problems but the debate still rages on over one central issue: wealth creation. Pure capitalism touts meritocracy, success by work and effort, pulling yourself up by your bootstraps. …


A deep dive into all the reasons we can’t all be rich and why capitalism is still the way to go in light of this in America.

Image for post
Image for post

Whether it’s resources or money not everyone can be rich. To understand why this is, we first have to look at the lifestyle of the rich. Whether now or thousands of years ago, being rich has always provided one with the same types of luxuries. Tangibly speaking (I’ll address the intangibles later), you have access to the rarest things, the nicest things, and the things that take the most labor to produce. If rich people get the rarest things, obviously everyone can’t have them because they’re rare. If they get the nicest things, it stands to reason that the owners of those nice things would charge as much as they can get for them, which obviously leads to rich people being the only ones who can afford those things. And if they get the things that take the most labor to produce, it’s obvious that those who labored on those things will sell them for as much as they can get for them because time and effort are their own currency. There seems to be a perspective circling around that everyone should have an equal amount of wealth and that we should all be able to experience the nice things. As we just saw though that’s impossible. …


Image for post
Image for post

If you had to sum up the entirety of progressive values as they stand in the current movement it would be the push for everyone to have their basic needs met and for everyone to be treated equally just for being alive. These values are something that is relatively new to humanity. Not so new that whole movements haven’t been created around it before, for instance, any socialist or communist movement, but new enough that while being such a wholesome value it has never been executed with arguable success. …


Image for post
Image for post

The discussion over mail-in voting becoming the standard method of voting this fall has become very heated recently as President Trump has claimed it will increase voter fraud and that we will have to wait for the results over an extended period of time. Despite the typical resistance democrat reaction to discredit anything the president says there are many serious concerns about the efficacy of putting together a nationwide, unpiloted, mail-in voting election in just a few months in the midst of a health and economic crisis. With the Iowa Caucus Debacle of 2020 and concerns over tens of thousands of mail-in ballots being thrown out in New York Primaries fresh in our minds the concerns over voting methods and accuracy shouldn’t be taken lightly. Of course, this isn’t to say that mail-in voting as a method in a normal time, and given time to develop state-by-state is a bad idea but that of course isn’t the situation we are in right now. …


Image for post
Image for post

As I’m writing this, Congress is discussing the next stimulus package in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic that has not only taken a toll health-wise but also economically. The majority of the public is watching with disgust as bickering over corporate liability shields and complaints over the deficit are being thrown around taking up precious time as millions of Americans watch the clock tick towards eviction. We watched with disgust as the last major stimulus package bailed out industries and big businesses by the billions and the average person appeared to be an afterthought. Shortly after we watched announcements of the massive amounts of wealth that moved to the top during this pandemic now totaling near or over $600 billion dollars of increased wealth for billionaires. And while I don’t entirely agree with this next criticism, many have condemned the choice to give an extra $600/month in unemployment benefits with some saying this is encouraging people not to work. Aside from the fact that there aren’t enough jobs for people to even get and that this $600/month is saving people from all sorts of fallout, there was indubitably a better way. …

About

Nathaniel Allen

Political commentator, life coach, and moral philosophy fanatic. Here I talk about the perspectives, actions, and habits we can take to simply make life better.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store